In Memorial

Wilfred Louis “Wil” Ebel

Birth: 31 May 1930 Nebraska, USA

Death: 3 Jul 2018 (aged 88) Corona del Mar, Orange County, California, USA

Burial: Omaha National Cemetery, Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, USA

 

Biography:

Following a brief hospitalization, Wil Ebel passed away on July 3, 2018 in Corona Del Mar, California.  Wil was 88 years old.  A military honors burial took place at Omaha National Cemetery, Omaha, Nebraska on October 17, 2018.  Wil Ebel served in political appointments in Washington, DC under Presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan and Bush.  President Reagan named him Director, National Cemetery System and Chief Memorial Affairs Director of the Veterans Administration in July 1987.  His previous government service included assignments to the Selective Service System as Assistant Director, Deputy Director, and Acting Director; duties as Assistant Executive Officer to President Reagan’s Military Manpower Task Force; duties in the Office of the Secretary of Defense as Assistant to the Chairman, Total Force Study, and Project Officer with the Reserve Forces Policy Board; and Assistant Executive Officer to the Chief, Army Reserve.  He also served on the staff of President Ford’s Clemency Board and was co-author and co-editor of the Board’s Final Report to the President, published by the White House in 1976.  During the Nixon Administration he was on the staff of the Defense Manpower Commission, a joint White House-Congressional Commission. He earned a Masters Degree in International Relations from Syracuse University, was a graduate of the Harvard University Senior Managers in Government Program, in addition to the Executive Development Program of The George Washington University.  He is also a graduate of the Air War College and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.  As a graduate of the Army War College, he authored numerous articles on politico-military issues for professional military and academic journals and had written chapters for two books published by the National Defense University. After 37 years of service in the U.S. Army, he retired as a Colonel.  He was an active member of many military and patriotic organizations which have specially recognized him, such as The Reserve Officers Association, American Legion, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Non-Commissioned Officers Association, Military Order of World Wars, Military Order of Foreign Wars, National Guard Association, Senior Army Reserve Commanders Association, and the Reserve Forces Policy Board (OSD). COL Ebel was awarded 11 military decorations, together with the Department of Army Civilian Distinguished Service Medal, the Department of Veterans Affairs Exceptional Service Medal, and two Selective Service Distinguished Service Medals.  Based upon this Christian gentleman’s exceptional generosity and magnanimous deportment, he was invested into four international Orders of Knighthood: the Templars, Saint Lazarus, Saint John, and St. Constantine the Great.  63rd Infantry Division Association, USAR.

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COL Alfred M. Diaz 
February 13, 2019

COL Alfred M. Diaz joined the Association and became a Life Member in November 2003.  He was elected to the Board Of Governors in 2004 and was still serving at his death. He served several years as President and as Vice President of the Association .  He was a member of the Board of the 63rd Infantry Division Association WWII.  Al was very active with the ROA and held many Elected Offices there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services for COL Alfred M. Diaz  Monday, 1 April 2019

Service at the Chapel at  Altavita Village,  followed by interment at the Riverside National Cemetery, followed by a reception back at Altavita Village

ROA life member Col. Alfred M. Diaz USA (Ret.) Col. Alfred M. Diaz, U.S. Army (Retired), an ROA lifetime member, died on February 13, 2019, in California.  Throughout his life of service with ROA, he served on various committees; but he was best known for his role as chairman of the resolution committee and as Army Vice President.  Al could always be counted on for two things: his commitment to ROA, demonstrated by faithful attendance at conventions and conferences, and by keeping everyone straight on Robert’s Rules of Order, of which he was a master.   When it came to briefing the resolution committee results during ROA general assemblies he did not believe in taking any more time than necessary.  This approach became a popular feature of the last day of the conference. 

In a letter to Colonel Diaz’s beloved wife, Martha, ROA’s national chaplain, retired Army Reserve Col. Sherman Reed, wrote, that Al’s “compassion and caring actions as well as his attention to detail, made him a valuable asset to ROA and its affiliate. . . . He was a genuine American hero.”

We will miss Colonel Al Diaz’s unwavering support of ROA, his sense of humor, his sharp wit, and his dedication to fellow members of the Reserve Components!

Condolence cards for the family  may be sent to 16725 Lew Allen CIrcle, Riverside , CA 9251

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CW4 Layland A. Carson

February 9, 2019

CW4 Layland Carson Joined the 63rd Infantry Division Association, USAR in 1981 and became a Life Member in May 1981.  He was elected to the Board of Governors in 1994 and served until 2014.  He was Membership Chairman for most of his time on the Board. He was made Member of the Board Emeritus in 2014.  
He served in the 163rd Signal Battalion, 63rd Infantry Division, USAR from 1959 until 1966.  He served in the 63rd ARCOM and successor units until his retirement.  
Layland was Interned on  Wednesday, February 27, 2019 at Riverside National Veterans Cemetery.

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Major Raymond Henry Edgerly

October 8, 1919 - January 5, 2018

Raymond Henry Edgerly was born October 8, 1919 in St. Louis, Missouri.  He moved with his family to California in 1926.  He had attended Compton Junior College, where he met Dorthea, who he later married.   A year later he enlisted in the 40th Division, California Guard in the spring of 1940.  The 40th was federalized March 3, 1941 and sent to Camp San Louis Obispo.  Ray was in an Ambulance Company, attended Medical Technicians School and had been promoted to Sergeant by the time of the Pearl Harbor attack. He was on pass and visiting Dorthea at her home in Downey that day and heard that all passes were canceled and to report back to camp. 

Ray’s duties took him on frequent trips between Fort MacArthur and Camp Hann in Riverside which allowed him to drop notes off in Downey for Dorthea.  They got married April 4, 1942.  He was selected to attend Officers’ Candidate School and graduated July 22, 1942 as a Second Lieutenant in class number 1, Medical Service Corps, the only Army medical branch that could not command a medical unit.

In 1943, he was transferred to a Medical unit and served as a platoon leader in an eight ambulance platoon in the North African Campaign.  Later, he served with units conducting anti-submarine warfare along the South American Coast.  Ray did not talk much about his deployment to North Africa.   Of his several decorations, the one he was most proud was his Combat Medical Badge.  His claim to fame was belonging to the “Old Brown Shoe Army” before Pearl Harbor."  Ray was separated from the Army in November 1945.  He continued his service after the war, as a Reserve Officer, with periods of active duty and training, until his retirement in 1979, after thirty-nine years of service.

His medals include: Bronze Star, Army Achievement Medal, American Defense Medal, American Campaign Medal with Oak Leaf Clusters, European-African-Middle East Campaign with Oak Leaf Cluster, WWII Victory Medal, WWII Occupation Medal, Armed Forces Reserve Medal with three Hourglasses, and Army Reserve Component Achievement Medal.

After separation from the Army, Ray graduated with a Master’s Degree in Medical Parasitology from the University of Southern California Medical School and he received a Master’s in Public Health Degree from the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley.  He managed to serve in three Health Departments, as Deputy Health Officer. These were: Riverside, Los Angeles City and Orange County.  He served as a Deputy Health Officer in Orange County until his retirement in 1983.  While working with restaurant health inspections, Ray was proud that he got Orange County to adopt an ABC grading system.

In 1991 Ray heard of the 63rd Infantry Division Association, USAR which was associated with one of the Reserve organizations he had been assigned to.  They held an annual reunion dinner to allow former members to renew friendships. Ray was looking for something like the Association so he joined and became a Life Member in 1991. Ray became active and was elected to the Board of Governors in 1997.  He accepted the Treasure‘s job in 1999 and held that position until 2009.  At that time he became a member of the Board of Governors Emeritus.  He attended meetings and reunions until 2016 when it became too difficult to attend.  Dorthea, Ray’s wife confided with my wife that the activity and challenges of serving on the Board of Governors kept him alive and active for many years.  We had a Retirement Luncheon on August 2009 at the Oceanside Jolly Roger Restaurant (one of Ray’s favorite restaurants).  It was well attended by Board Members, friends and family.  We met Cyndi, Ray’s daughter, and his two granddaughters, Jacqui and Alli while they were visiting Ray and Dorthea.

 I was on the Board serving as Secretary when Ray joined the board and we hit it off right away.  In those days the wives or significant other accompanied the board members to the meetings.  We usually had 6 to 9 women sitting at a table near our meeting. They became our woman’s auxiliary.  Many of the Board Members spent the night before our Annual Reunion Meeting at the hotel.  We would meet early and have cocktails, snacks and then go out for dinner. Our axillary planned these social gatherings.  When Ray joined the Board as Treasurer in 1999, Dorthea joined too.  For many years Ray got an extra-large hotel room and hosted the Saturday evening social gathering in his room.

 In 2004 my wife and I moved to Oceanside and found Ray and Dorthea lived only two miles away. On our first visit to his home we were impressed with all of the paintings Ray had hanging in his home that he had painted.  He had a lot of framed pictures just leaning against the walls waiting their turn to be rotated into his gallery. He was very good and very prolific with his art talent. Every time we visited Ray, he had to show us all of the new paintings.  We found that we shared October as the birthday month for Ray, Dorthea, and my wife Rae Ann and always celebrated together with a birthday luncheon.

Ray read a lot and it was mostly nonfiction; - histories, military and otherwise, about people and the times.  His library was large and he liked to talk about what he read. Sharing his thoughts with us and if we seemed interested, he sometimes would loan us some of his books.  When I was editor of the BLADE newsletter, I could always count on Ray to give me a column of fascinating reading, be it a book review or a war story to fill the page I needed when I ran out of material.

Ray had a love for working with and growing plants around his house and garden.  He took to using his computer easily. He also built some electronic kits just to try to understand some simple electronics.  He soldered all the components together.  When he was finished he had an array of small circuits with randomly flashing lights which he proudly displayed on a wall in his living room.

 

He and Dorthea were deeply involved in genealogy and had their family histories printed in hard covered books.  Ray took three sets of the 63rd Infantry Division Association, USAR Annual Reports and had them bound into a set of books and presented two bound copies to the Association. He had many interests.

 

We ride shared driving from Oceanside to Placentia to our quarterly Board meetings, all four of us. We got to know each other better.  We both had cars with veteran’s license plates with the 63rd Division insignia on it. The state issued these stickers and in a year or two the sun faded the “Flaming Blade”   into a funny looking pastel knife. The state replaced our decals once and did not reorder more.  After that, Ray and I started repainting our decals back to their original Flaming glory. 

We were all surprised when Dorthea passed away on April 4, 2011 on their 69th wedding anniversary.  She went very quickly.  I think we thought she would out live Ray.  Ray stayed active and attended the Annual Meetings of the Association every year through 2016.  He was still alert when he spoke to the meeting telling one of his many Army stories.  Rae Ann and I would get together periodically with Ray for a glass of wine or to go to one of our two favorite restaurants, the Jolly Roger on Oceanside Harbor or the On the Border in Escondido.

We noticed that Ray was slowing down with his walker and in other little ways as his 99 years were taking their toll.  He was a great Soldier and Friend. We will miss him.

Remarks in honor to Ray Edgerly made at the Riverside National Cemetery by LTC Donald Wirth, US Army Ret

        

         

In Memorial

MAJOR RAYMOND HENRY EDGERLY

          Ray's Daughter's

         Tribute to her father

MAJOR Raymond Henry Edgerly, often called "Ray," was born October 8,1919, in St. Louis, Missouri. He descended from Judge Thomas Edgerly who arrived at the Oyster River Settlement, New Hampshire from England in 1665. He was tthe ninth in his line, which included solders who fought in every major War in this country's history. Several of his Puritan progenitors arrived with John Winthrop's fleet in 1630.

 

He was most proud of his grandfather 5 generations ago who stormed the bastion of Louisburg, Nova Scotia with General Pepperell in 1745; of James, his great, great grandfather who served with General John Sullivan in 1776; and of his grandfather Major Henry Clay Edgerly who was wounded at Seven Pines, in 1863, while serving with the Michigan 5th Infantry and later, became the Commanding Officer of the 8th Michigan Cavalry.

Raymond received most of his education in California where his family moved via the old plank road near Yuma in 1926, Parts of the old road can still be seen.

 

He attended Compton Junior College, where he met Dorthea, who was destined to become Mrs. Edgerly in early 1942.

He was an active member of the 40th Division, California National Guard in 1940, and rendered service to the State of California until his unit was federalized in early 1941. He was selected and completed training in battlefield surgery and medical aid at Ft. Bliss, Texas in 1941. He was selected to attend Officer' Candidate School at Abilene, Texas and graduated in July 1942, as a Second Lieutenant, class number one, Medical Service Corps.In 1943, he was transferred to a Medical unit and served in the North African Campaign. Later, he served with units conducting anti-submarine warfare along the South American Coast. Of his several decorations, the one he was most proud, was his Medical Combat Badge and his claim to have belonged to the Old Brown Shoe Army "before Pearl Harbor."

He continued his service after the war, as a Reserve Officer, with periods of active duty, until his retirement in 1979, after thirty-nine years of service.

 

During these years, he was graduated with a Masters Degree in Medical Parasitology from the University of Southern California Medical School and he received a Masters in Public Health Degree from the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley.

 

Between his service in the Army, he managed to serve in three Health Departments, as Deputy Health Officer. These were: Riverside, Los Angeles City and Orange County. He served as a Deputy Health Officer in Orange County until his retirement in 1983.

 

He served as a Board Member and Treasurer to the Oceanside Manor Home Owners Association for eight years. He was a member of the Carlsbad Genealogical Society; a Life member of the Reserve Officers Association and a Life Member of the 63D Infantry Division Association where he served as a member of the Board of Governors and as Treasurer.

 

Raymond was a private man, an intellectual who was an avid reader of history, with special interest in the Civil War, science and biography hi 1943, he was transferred to a Medical unit and served in the North African Campaign. Later, he served with units conducting anti-submarine warfare along the South American Coast. Of his several decorations, the one he was most proud, was his Medical Combat Badge and his claim to have belonged to the Old Brown Shoe Army "before Pearl Harbor."

 

He continued his service after the war, as a Reserve Officer, with periods of active duty, until his retirement in 1979, after thirty-nine years of service.

 

During these years, he was graduated with a Masters Degree in Medical Parasitology from the University of Southern California Medical School and he received a Masters in Public Health Degree from the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley.

 

Between his service in the Army, he managed to serve in three Health Departments, as Deputy Health Officer. These were: Riverside, Los Angeles City and Orange County. He served as a Deputy Health Officer in Orange County until his retirement in 1983.

He served as a Board Member and Treasurer to the Oceanside Manor Home Owners Association for eight years. He was a member of the Carlsbad Genealogical Society; a Life member of the Reserve Officers Association and a Life Member of the 63D Infantry Division Association where he served as a member of the Board of Governors and as Treasurer.

Raymond was a private man, an intellectual who was an avid reader of history, with special interest in the Civil War, science and biography.

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SGM George Satoshi Ichimura
July 2, 1930 – October 3, 2018

George Satoshi Ichimura was born in Los Angeles, California on July 2, 1930.  He went to Japan and was there after the war started.  We do not too much information on George’s life.  Some of us served with him and we are hoping put together his life story. 

SGM Jere Hyde received a message on his answering machine from George’s sister telling us that George had passed away. When he called the number, the sister answered and invited us to a small family get-together at George’s home.  SGM Hyde emailed the Association of George’s passing.

 

Jere was invited to a small family service…more of a Celebration of Life, than a funeral, about 20 family and friends were there.  I went alone and met his family; I was the only one there from the military.  Jere was a friend of George’s from the 311th COSCOM.  He went with George (He acted at NCOIC) to Japan for exercise Yama Sakura, two times to Sendai, and two times to Chitose on Hokkaido.

 

George joined the Association and became a Life Member in December, 2000.

He attended the Annual Brunch meetings regularly and always brought his camera.  He shared his pictures with the editors of the Annual Report Magazine.  His work was so good that the Board of Governors asked him if he would be our photographer.   He continued until 2016 when the film lab he was using was closed down.  He apologized to the Board, but he was film photographer and would not lower himself to using a digital camera.  

 

MG Jerry Josten presents received the Eagle Award  to SGM George Ichimura “In Appreciation for his Dedication and Outstanding Performance as Association Photographer” April 2005. 

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LTC Eldred Caffey

29 December, 2018.

It is with a heavy heart that I send this notice of the passing of LTC Eldred Caffey.  Eldred served within the 311th COSCOM command for many years last serving in the 304th CMMC.  Eldred passed away on 29 December, 2018. Interned at Riverside National Veterans Cemetery February 8, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Albert Ewens

MARCH 13, 1939 – MAY 16, 2018

 

Michael A. Ewens reported to his final duty station on 16 May 2018, upon orders from his highest commander. He always obeyed orders from those appointed above him. Mike passed away at age 79, following a brave battle with cancer.

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on 13 March 1939 to Bud and Meta Ewens, Michael laid out his life from the very beginning as a young man. He was greatly influenced while reading Theodore Roosevelt’s “African Game Trails” at an early age and became a devoted admirer of our 26th U.S. President. His goal was to follow Teddy as a cowboy, policeman, Army officer, National Park staff, environmentalist, conservationist, educator, big game hunter and climber of mountains. All of Roosevelt’s writings remained a creed of behavior for Mike’s entire life, as he accomplished everything he set out to do.

Michael was deeply involved in Boy Scouting for over 60 years – from childhood into adulthood, leading his two sons. He has passionately volunteered with the American Red Cross for 60+ years – as a boy assisting his mother and grandmother during World War II and for decades as a CPR/First Aid Instructor, Disaster Preparedness/ Emergency Response Administrator and Mass Care Shelter Manager. He retired as a U.S. Army Colonel after 31 years, having served tours in Vietnam, Cold War Germany, Kuwait, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and many stints at the Pentagon. Professor Mike enthusiastically taught business courses at Ventura College for 34 years, continuing to receive compliments from prior students. Throughout his life, he had been a Reserve Police Officer, a National Park Ranger in the Grand Tetons of Wyoming, a Safety Manager in the off-shore oil industry, a Social Services Director for the Salvation Army, a Manpower Programs Chief with County Government, and an active member of his church Our Lady of the Assumption, as a Eucharistic Minister. Whatever the endeavor, Michael fully committed and shared himself with compassion, dedication, and a missionary heart.

The word Outdoorsman doesn’t do Mike justice … he needed to be outside appreciating “God’s Country”. He eagerly enjoyed hunting, fishing, hiking, and camping all over the Mountain West while owning and operating a ranch in northern New Mexico.

Michael Ewens always filled the room with his presence. He was larger than life with a vibrant personality, easy to know and such a kind, memorable man. He definitely touched many lives, but none more than his beloved family: lifetime soulmate Col. Lydia, his sons, Scott and Matt, his brothers John and Tom, Nieces Becky and Denise, Nephew Andy, godson John & wife Amy, and all of their amazing families. He will be greatly missed by numerous cousins and countless friends.

Please consider donating to the American Red Cross in Camarillo, CA. or to the Martinez y Ewens Anasazi Scholarship at Ventura College Foundation to honor Mike.

A Rosary and Celebration of Life Mass will be held Thursday, 7 June 2018, 10:00 A.M., at Our Lady of the Assumption, 3175 Telegraph Road, Ventura, CA. 93003.

A Military Funeral Service and Internment was at Riverside National Veterans Cemetery.